The Money Masters

Went along to the free movie at the Cross again. This one was the total other end of the spectrum of lucidity and research from previous conspiracy styled stuff.

They showed The Money Masters (part 1), an absolutely stunning hidden history of the international banking system, and the open battle for control between central banks and governments.

(Through the magic of interweb, you can watch it here, though if you can afford it, I’d recommend buying it.)

If you have the slightest interest in money, power, and what the hell is going on in the world, I really urge you to check this out. Really really amazing information. Watching it I was really stunned that we are not taught this.

All the perplexities, confusion and distresses in America arise not from defects
in the Constitution or confederation, nor from want of honor or virtue, as much from downright ignorance of the nature of coin, credit, and circulation.” (John Adams)

The doco is densely researched, and, frankly, kind of dull to look at, but the content is staggering as we are taken through an extensively quoted history of the set up of banking systems – an amazing con job – and how swiftly this turned to controlling the government. Who controls the creation of money controls the government – and why the hell anyone other than the government would have that power is beyond me.

Probably the most fascinating angle to me was that central banks have the power to create a boom or bust essentially at will by controlling the amount of money available. Due to fractional reserve lending, only a small minority of the money in circulation has backing in reality. If the bank calls in its debts and refuses to make new loans, you get a choked economy. That the private owners of the bank would do this for political gain comes through as a documented fact. Further, the logic of war as a means to indebt nations comes through, and wars can be prompted through economic crises…

Aaaagh. There is way more here than I have mentioned above. Check this stuff out. Really.

They are showing part 2 next Monday, 7:30 pm.

No Responses to “The Money Masters”

  1.   amy
    September 21st, 2006 | 9:28 pm

    I decided to work in a bank even after feeling disalusioned by society and capitalism, my approach was a nieve one, I remember telling my mum, that I thought society was really messed up, I had just finished my system’s diploma at 20 and decided that it would be a good first job as a database manager, and that I would experience for myself, if banks were corrupt or not.

    This is what I found out:

    This system is driven by two things only… money and and a really greedy culture. When you get your contract, 80% of your wages are paid up front and then the additional is in expected sales rewards. So, you are reviewed every 3 months or so and drilled on why you didn’t sell this or that person debt.
    ( I remember being asked to sign people i knew outside of working hours into debt plans.
    And being told off for refusing to comply.)
    Then after achieving a year at the bank you are entitled to enter into their free share scheme where by they gift you $1000 free NAB (National Australian Bank) share’s, every year, for doing nothing at all.
    The amount of share’s gifted depends on your hierary within the role, so, obviously CEO and Manager’s get bigger bonus scheme’s in their pay packets.
    The culture is driven by this idea they call Max Sat… Max Sat stands for Maximum Customer Satisfaction.
    They believe that Happy Shareholders = Happy Customers.
    If we keep the shareholders happy then we make money which in turn keeps everybody happy.
    I find it interesting that a huge portion of NAB share’s are owned within the organisation which I think contribute’s to a greedy culture.
    The power a CEO has over this entity is unreal, especially when his retirement package counts on a good share price?

    ***On Debt!… The Bnz was brought into the media last year for sending out pre approved credit card’s to random customers.
    I experienced this, as a teller, having to teach under educated people about how their cards worked and that no, there was no more money on their cards!…****

  2.   The Scarlet Manuka
    September 22nd, 2006 | 10:54 am

    All publicly traded corporations behave like that, not just banks. They are legally obliged to seek maximum profits at the expense of everything else. Ethics are only acceptable to a corporation when the positive PR results in increased profits.

  3.   Pearce
    September 22nd, 2006 | 3:04 pm

    At Harvard Business School, the course on Ethics is optional.

    Says it all really.

  4.   Andrew
    September 22nd, 2006 | 10:43 pm

    Though I’d check what Havard Business School’s course on Ethics is like before suggesting it should be compulsory…

  5. September 26th, 2006 | 1:31 am

    […] Watched the second part of this last night. (Available to watch free on the web here: and I strongly urge anyone interested to do so. I linked to part one in the earlier post.) This stuff is the best account of how international banking and the money system works that I have yet encountered. […]

  6.   Administrator
    October 14th, 2006 | 12:36 am

    It looks like part one of the money masters has reappeared online here

  7. April 15th, 2009 | 12:54 pm

    […] His schtick is similar to the Money Masters type view of the economy – the systemic flaws are to do with the nature of the money system, with money being an illusion with no basis untethered to things that actually exist, but having power to create real effects; and heavily critical of the role of central banks – but without the conspiracy angle, so more mainstream palatable, if the crowd was anything to go by. […]

  8. April 15th, 2009 | 12:55 pm

    […] His schtick is similar to the Money Masters type view of the economy – the systemic flaws are to do with the nature of the money system, with money being an illusion with no basis untethered to things that actually exist, but having power to create real effects; and heavily critical of the role of central banks – but without the conspiracy angle, so more mainstream palatable, if the crowd was anything to go by. […]