vote drunk: on engaging youth voters and non voters

 

Is there anything to say you can’t turn up to vote drunk and stoned, and dressed like a clown, or a superhero, or a zombie, or whatever? Not so far as I know. As long as you have ID and can tick a box, who cares?

Maybe to engage youth voters (and the non-voting near majority) we need to go to where they are. Endorse a culture in which voting is a fun way to spend an afternoon. #votedrunk

I guess the challenge is your mates may live in a different electorate. So how about an election pub crawl through various electorates? Make a day of it.

The costume angle appeals. Imagine election weekend sort of like the Sevens but in a good way. Sort of “dress in a way that captures how you feel about the system” as a theme? Everyone dressed up and running around drunk. Or whatever. I mean, hell, how much of an excuse do we need? It’s only once every three years.

Not something I have thought through… but I do like the idea of turning up intoxicated in a clown suit to vote. It captures something.

 

 

3 Responses to “vote drunk: on engaging youth voters and non voters”

  1.   bekitty
    September 14th, 2014 | 10:10 am

    You don’t need ID to vote in NZ elections. It helps if you have your EasyVote card, but it’s not essential. If you’re over 18, and your name is on a printed electoral roll that is held at the voting place, you can cast an ordinary vote. If your name is not on a printed electoral roll, then you can cast a special vote.

    It’s not the job of the issuing officers to determine whether or not someone is eligible to vote. We don’t turn people away. We LIKE as many people as possible getting the opportunity to vote. Voting is a civil right, after all, and it’s in everyone’s best interests to protect that right.

    Speaking personally, I think it would be FANTASTIC if people turned up to vote in costume. It would absolutely make my day! 😀

  2.   billy
    September 20th, 2014 | 1:15 pm

    Someone who worked as a scrutineer/observer person in previous elections told me that they can mark the number of a person who is drunk and have their ballot removed and not counted! 🙁

  3.   bruce
    September 25th, 2014 | 5:11 pm

    >Someone who worked as a scrutineer/observer person in previous elections told me that they can mark the number of a person who is drunk and have their ballot removed and not counted! 🙁

    not surprising, and yet that’s pretty hard core, eh? removing one’s smidgen of representation based on a judgement call. Do they get trained as well as bartenders to judge intoxication?

    I expect roving around in costume would perhaps fly for a while but if it got popular i expect it would be judged a threat to civil order and treated accordingly– other voters feeling “threatened” perhaps.

    sorry to say but while I do vote, did vote, and did and do encourage voting, i do not believe it is the way to change the world and judge that it is a distraction/waste of effort. Which is not to say that there are probably some awesome individuals out there who do make a difference (at least in terms of who gets elected) with get out the vote efforts.

    somewhat surprised at the smackdown I got on FB for signing an election recount petition. Where I come from elections are a) commonly stolen (Kennedy and Bush Jr being pretty clear examples)and b) anything goes in challenging the legitimacy of the elected officials.

    a friend noted that the last minute orange “it’s essential” stickers on National billboards happened to be in the same color as the official electoral commission style. Which is a good dirty trick even if not illegal.